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Welcome to The Sommomlier. I write about wine and motherhood. Because sometimes one leads to the other. Let's geek out together.

Tour de Spain: Yecla

Tour de Spain: Yecla

Why hello dear readers! Is it just me, or is October sailing by? I barely found the time to sit down and get a caffeine fix this month, so it's no wonder that I'm a little behind on my posts. Anyhow, I had a chance to try a wine from a Spanish wine region that I actually don't know much about: Yecla (pronounced: Yay-cla). It's a subregion of Murcia, which is in the Southeastern part of Spain and is a neighbor to our friend Jumilla. Despite being rather tiny, Yecla produces all types of wines: red, white, rosado (rosé), sparkling wines, and fortified wines. Yecla is basically the overachiever of Spain, which I can certainly tip my hat to. Much of the black grapes planted here are Monastrell, followed by Garnacha, Tempranillo, and international grape varieties like Cabernet Sauvignon and Syrah. Monastrell is so heavily planted because it fares well in the very hot summers of Yecla and it ripens late, which means that it won't become overripe by harvest, which would result in a baked or overly jammy flavored wine with high alcohol and low acidity. Translation: gross wine.

Vineyards of Gordo

Vineyards of Gordo

When I was browsing the Spanish wine aisle in search of my next muse, my eyes landed on Gordo Yecla 2012. I really don't advocate picking a wine based on what its label looks like, but I had to give in this time. I think it's because hubs and I are hooked on the new HBO show West World, so I was feeling like a cowboy and the bottle just shouted Wild West. I may have also chuckled because Gordo means "fat" in Spanish. Apparently, I have the funny bone of a 12 year old.

This fat wine is a blend of Monastrell and Cabernet Sauvignon (70% and 30% respectively). Fun fact: Monastrell is the same grape variety as Mourvedre, which is what the grape is called in Southern France. The producer's vineyards are located at a high altitude, so it's actually cooler than its neighboring subregions. This gives the grape a longer growing season and allows for a fresh and aromatic wine. Gordo showed the classic meaty character of Monastrell along with spice notes of clove and vanilla, and black fruits like blackberry, blackcurrant, black cherry, and plum. The alcohol was high and rather obvious, so it wasn't as balanced with the fruit and spice as I would prefer, but it felt warm and toasty. Overall, it was a pretty good wine, especially considering the price. It would pair well with some meat roasted over a fire in the middle of the desert and some hunting of outlaws.

Gordo Yecla 2012: a dusty thumbs up! $12.99

Another fun fact: my little dude is turning 3 on Friday! He's growing into a wild, wild, WILD and sweet little man and I'm loving every second with him :)

Off the Grid: Aligoté

Off the Grid: Aligoté

Tour de Spain: Rioja

Tour de Spain: Rioja